Privacy + Cookies

Privacy Policy

Last updated 7.6.2012

Collection Of Routine Information

All web servers track basic information about their visitors. This information includes, but is not limited to, IP addresses, browser details, timestamps and referring pages. None of this information can personally identify specific visitors to this site. The information is tracked for routine administration and maintenance purposes.

Cookies and Web Beacons

Where necessary, this website uses cookies to store information about a visitor’s preferences and history in order to better serve the visitor and/or present the visitor with customized content.

We use third-party advertising companies to serve ads when you visit our website. These companies may use information (not including your name, address, email address, or telephone number) about your visits to this and other websites in order to provide advertisements about goods and services of interest to you. Such tracking is done directly by the third parties through their own servers and is subject to their own privacy policies. If you would like more information about this practice and to know your choices about not having this information used by these companies, visit these sites:

What are DART cookies?

Opt out of DART cookies

Opt out of Google DART cookies

Controlling Your Privacy

Note that you can change your browser settings to disable cookies if you have privacy concerns. Disabling cookies for all sites is not recommended as it may interfere with your use of some sites. The best option is to disable or enable cookies on a per-site basis. Consult your browser documentation for instructions on how to block cookies and other tracking mechanisms.

Which Cookies are used on this site?

PHP
PHPSESSID

PHP Session

This cookie is required for the operation of this website.

Unknown
id_log
user_koszyk
contentgarage_com
articlelive
visitorxarticlesmenu_com
Template–articlesmenu_com
FeedProvider–articlesmenu_com
user_przechowalnia
MV_SESSION_ID
_st
_sr
lang
kemana_password
kemana_user_id
t
gvc
licznik
COOKIE
vtmnrtwclg
referrer
WEB
uid
XTCsid
SessionID
sgUID
langPref
sid
SESS8573f7aaf6450129ffb92d7628e43b8b
tu
parkinglot
ooep
Website
cookillian_opt_*

This cookie stores your preference regarding the use of cookies on this website.

WordPress
wp-settings-*

This cookie helps remember your personal preferences within WordPress.

wordpress_*

This cookie stores WordPress authentication details.

comment_author_*

This cookie remembers your last comment details, such as your name and email address, so that you will not have to type it again.

More on HTTP cookies

A cookie, also known as an HTTP cookie, web cookie, or browser cookie, is usually a small piece of data sent from a website and stored in a user’s web browser while a user is browsing a website. When the user browses the same website in the future, the data stored in the cookie can be retrieved by the website to notify the website of the user’s previous activity.[1] Cookies were designed to be a reliable mechanism for websites to remember the state of the website or activity the user had taken in the past. This can include clicking particular buttons, logging in, or a record of which pages were visited by the user even months or years ago.

Although cookies cannot carry viruses, and cannot install malware on the host computer,[2] tracking cookies and especially third-party tracking cookies are commonly used as ways to compile long-term records of individuals’ browsing histories — a major privacy concern that has prompted European and US law makers to take action.[3][4]

Other kinds of cookies perform essential functions in the modern Web. Perhaps most importantly, authentication cookies are the most common method used by web servers to know whether the user is logged in or not, and which account they are logged in under. Without such a mechanism, the site would not know whether to send a page full of sensitive information, or a message saying “sorry, you need to log in”. The security of an authentication cookie generally depends on the security of the issuing website and the user’s web browser. If not implemented correctly, a cookie’s data can be intercepted by a hacker to gain unapproved access to the user’s data and possibly to the originating website.[5]

Uses

Session management

Cookies may be used to maintain data related to the user during navigation, possibly across multiple visits. Cookies were introduced to provide a way to implement a “shopping cart” (or “shopping basket”),[7][8] a virtual device into which users can store items they want to purchase as they navigate throughout the site.

Shopping basket applications today usually store the list of basket contents in a database on the server side, rather than storing basket items in the cookie itself. A web server typically sends a cookie containing a unique session identifier. The web browser will send back that session identifier with each subsequent request and shopping basket items are stored associated with a unique session identifier.

Allowing users to log in to a website is a frequent use of cookies. Typically the web server will first send a cookie containing a unique session identifier. Users then submit their credentials and the web application authenticates the session and allows the user access to services.

Personalization

Cookies may be used to remember the information about the user who has visited a website in order to show relevant content in the future. For example a web server may send a cookie containing the username last used to log in to a website so that it may be filled in for future visits.

Many websites use cookies for personalization based on users’ preferences. Users select their preferences by entering them in a web form and submitting the form to the server. The server encodes the preferences in a cookie and sends the cookie back to the browser. This way, every time the user accesses a page, the server is also sent the cookie where the preferences are stored, and can personalize the page according to the user preferences. For example, the Wikipedia website allows authenticated users to choose the webpage skin they like best; the Google search engine once allowed users (even non-registered ones) to decide how many search results per page they want to see.

Tracking

Tracking cookies may be used to track internet users’ web browsing habits. This can also be done in part by using the IP address of the computer requesting the page or the referrer field of the HTTP request header, but cookies allow for greater precision. This can be demonstrated as follows:

If the user requests a page of the site, but the request contains no cookie, the server presumes that this is the first page visited by the user; the server creates a random string and sends it as a cookie back to the browser together with the requested page;
From this point on, the cookie will be automatically sent by the browser to the server every time a new page from the site is requested; the server sends the page as usual, but also stores the URL of the requested page, the date/time of the request, and the cookie in a log file.

By analyzing the log file collected in the process, it is then possible to find out which pages the user has visited, and in what sequence.

Types of Cookies

Session cookie

A session cookie[12] only lasts for the duration of users using the website. A web browser normally deletes session cookies when it quits. A session cookie is created when no Expires directive is provided at cookie creation time.

Persistent cookie

A persistent cookie[12] will outlast user sessions. If a persistent cookie has its Max-Age set to 1 year, then, within the year, the initial value set in that cookie would be sent back to the server every time the user visited the server. This could be used to record a vital piece of information such as how the user initially came to this website. For this reason persistent cookies are also called tracking cookies.

Secure cookie

A secure cookie has the secure attribute enabled and is only used via HTTPS, ensuring that the cookie is always encrypted when transmitting from client to server. This makes the cookie less likely to be exposed to cookie theft via eavesdropping.

HttpOnly cookie

The HttpOnly cookie is supported by most modern browsers.[13][14] On a supported browser, an HttpOnly session cookie will be used only when transmitting HTTP (or HTTPS) requests, thus restricting access from other, non-HTTP APIs (such as JavaScript). This restriction mitigates but does not eliminate the threat of session cookie theft via cross-site scripting (XSS).[15] This feature applies only to session-management cookies, and not other browser cookies.

Third-party cookie

First-party cookies are cookies set with the same domain (or its subdomain) in your browser’s address bar. Third-party cookies are cookies being set with different domains from the one shown on the address bar (i.e. the web pages on that domain may feature content from a third-party domain – e.g. an advertisement run by www.advexample.com showing advert banners). (Privacy setting options in most modern browsers allow you to block third-party tracking cookies).

For example: Suppose a user visits www.example1.com, which sets a cookie with the domain ad.foxytracking.com. When the user later visits www.example2.com, another cookie is set with the domain ad.foxytracking.com. Eventually, both of these cookies will be sent to the advertiser when loading their ads or visiting their website. The advertiser can then use these cookies to build up a browsing history of the user across all the websites this advertiser has footprints on.

Supercookie

A “supercookie” is a cookie with a public suffix domain, like .com, .co.uk or k12.ca.us.[16]

Most browsers, by default, allow first-party cookies—a cookie with domain to be the same or sub-domain of the requesting host. For example, a user visiting www.example.com can have a cookie set with domain www.example.com or .example.com, but not .com.[17] A supercookie with domain .com would be blocked by browsers; otherwise, a malicious website, like attacker.com, could set a supercookie with domain .com and potentially disrupt or impersonate legitimate user requests to example.com. The Public Suffix List is a cross-vendor initiative to provide an accurate list of domain name suffixes changing.[18] Older versions of browsers may not have the most up-to-date list, and will therefore be vulnerable to certain supercookies.

The term “supercookies” is sometimes used for tracking technologies that do not rely on HTTP cookies. Two such “supercookie” mechanisms were found on Microsoft websites: cookie syncing that respawned MUID cookies, and ETag cookies.[19] Due to media attention, Microsoft later disabled this code:

In response to recent attention on “supercookies” in the media, we wanted to share more detail on the immediate action we took to address this issue, as well as affirm our commitment to the privacy of our customers. According to researchers, including Jonathan Mayer at Stanford University, “supercookies” are capable of re-creating users’ cookies or other identifiers after people deleted regular cookies. Mr. Mayer identified Microsoft as one among others that had this code, and when he brought his findings to our attention we promptly investigated. We determined that the cookie behavior he observed was occurring under certain circumstances as a result of older code that was used only on our own sites, and was already scheduled to be discontinued. We accelerated this process and quickly disabled this code. At no time did this functionality cause Microsoft cookie identifiers or data associated with those identifiers to be shared outside of Microsoft.
—Mike Hintze[20]

LSO and Flash Cookies

LSO and Flash Cookies are automatically recreated after a user has deleted it. This is accomplished by a script storing the content of the cookie in some other locations, such as the local storage available to Flash content, HTML5 storages and other client side mechanisms, and then recreating the cookie from backup stores when the cookie’s absence is detected.

Learn how to control Flash Cookies here

This page contains text from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTTP_cookie (last modified on 24 June 2012 at 15:32). It is released under CC-BY-SA http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

For more information on cookies please visit these sites:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTTP_cookie
http://www.aboutcookies.org/

If you have concerns or questions about this privacy policy please use our contact form.

Für die Nutzung von Facebook-Plugins (Like-Button)

Auf unseren Seiten sind Plugins des sozialen Netzwerks Facebook, 1601 South California Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA integriert. Die Facebook-Plugins erkennen Sie an dem Facebook-Logo oder dem “Like-Button” (“Gefällt mir”) auf unserer Seite. Eine Übersicht über die Facebook-Plugins finden Sie hier: http://developers.facebook.com/docs/plugins/.
Wenn Sie unsere Seiten besuchen, wird über das Plugin eine direkte Verbindung zwischen Ihrem Browser und dem Facebook-Server hergestellt. Facebook erhält dadurch die Information, dass Sie mit Ihrer IP-Adresse unsere Seite besucht haben. Wenn Sie den Facebook “Like-Button” anklicken während Sie in Ihrem Facebook-Account eingeloggt sind, können Sie die Inhalte unserer Seiten auf Ihrem Facebook-Profil verlinken. Dadurch kann Facebook den Besuch unserer Seiten Ihrem Benutzerkonto zuordnen. Wir weisen darauf hin, dass wir als Anbieter der Seiten keine Kenntnis vom Inhalt der übermittelten Daten sowie deren Nutzung durch Facebook erhalten. Weitere Informationen hierzu finden Sie in der Datenschutzerklärung von facebook unter http://de-de.facebook.com/policy.php

Wenn Sie nicht wünschen, dass Facebook den Besuch unserer Seiten Ihrem Facebook-Nutzerkonto zuordnen kann, loggen Sie sich bitte aus Ihrem Facebook-Benutzerkonto aus.

Für die Nutzung von Google Analytics

Diese Website benutzt Google Analytics, einen Webanalysedienst der Google Inc. (“Google”). Google Analytics verwendet sog. “Cookies”, Textdateien, die auf Ihrem Computer gespeichert werden und die eine Analyse der Benutzung der Website durch Sie ermöglichen. Die durch den Cookie erzeugten Informationen über Ihre Benutzung dieser Website werden in der Regel an einen Server von Google in den USA übertragen und dort gespeichert. Im Falle der Aktivierung der IP-Anonymisierung auf dieser Webseite wird Ihre IP-Adresse von Google jedoch innerhalb von Mitgliedstaaten der Europäischen Union oder in anderen Vertragsstaaten des Abkommens über den Europäischen Wirtschaftsraum zuvor gekürzt.

Nur in Ausnahmefällen wird die volle IP-Adresse an einen Server von Google in den USA übertragen und dort gekürzt. Im Auftrag des Betreibers dieser Website wird Google diese Informationen benutzen, um Ihre Nutzung der Website auszuwerten, um Reports über die Websiteaktivitäten zusammenzustellen und um weitere mit der Websitenutzung und der Internetnutzung verbundene Dienstleistungen gegenüber dem Websitebetreiber zu erbringen. Die im Rahmen von Google Analytics von Ihrem Browser übermittelte IP-Adresse wird nicht mit anderen Daten von Google zusammengeführt.

Sie können die Speicherung der Cookies durch eine entsprechende Einstellung Ihrer Browser-Software verhindern; wir weisen Sie jedoch darauf hin, dass Sie in diesem Fall gegebenenfalls nicht sämtliche Funktionen dieser Website vollumfänglich werden nutzen können. Sie können darüber hinaus die Erfassung der durch das Cookie erzeugten und auf Ihre Nutzung der Website bezogenen Daten (inkl. Ihrer IP-Adresse) an Google sowie die Verarbeitung dieser Daten durch Google verhindern, indem sie das unter dem folgenden Link verfügbare Browser-Plugin herunterladen und installieren: http://tools.google.com/dlpage/gaoptout?hl=de.

Für die Nutzung von Google Adsense
Diese Website benutzt Google AdSense, einen Dienst zum Einbinden von Werbeanzeigen der Google Inc. (“Google”). Google AdSense verwendet sog. “Cookies”, Textdateien, die auf Ihrem Computer gespeichert werden und die eine Analyse der Benutzung der Website ermöglicht. Google AdSense verwendet auch so genannte Web Beacons (unsichtbare Grafiken). Durch diese Web Beacons können Informationen wie der Besucherverkehr auf diesen Seiten ausgewertet werden.

Die durch Cookies und Web Beacons erzeugten Informationen über die Benutzung dieser Website (einschließlich Ihrer IP-Adresse) und Auslieferung von Werbeformaten werden an einen Server von Google in den USA übertragen und dort gespeichert. Diese Informationen können von Google an Vertragspartner von Google weiter gegeben werden. Google wird Ihre IP-Adresse jedoch nicht mit anderen von Ihnen gespeicherten Daten zusammenführen.

Sie können die Installation der Cookies durch eine entsprechende Einstellung Ihrer Browser Software verhindern; wir weisen Sie jedoch darauf hin, dass Sie in diesem Fall gegebenenfalls nicht sämtliche Funktionen dieser Website voll umfänglich nutzen können. Durch die Nutzung dieser Website erklären Sie sich mit der Bearbeitung der über Sie erhobenen Daten durch Google in der zuvor beschriebenen Art und Weise und zu dem zuvor benannten Zweck einverstanden.

Für die Nutzung von Google +1
Erfassung und Weitergabe von Informationen:
Mithilfe der Google +1-Schaltfläche können Sie Informationen weltweit veröffentlichen. über die Google +1-Schaltfläche erhalten Sie und andere Nutzer personalisierte Inhalte von Google und unseren Partnern. Google speichert sowohl die Information, dass Sie für einen Inhalt +1 gegeben haben, als auch Informationen über die Seite, die Sie beim Klicken auf +1 angesehen haben. Ihre +1 können als Hinweise zusammen mit Ihrem Profilnamen und Ihrem Foto in Google-Diensten, wie etwa in Suchergebnissen oder in Ihrem Google-Profil, oder an anderen Stellen auf Websites und Anzeigen im Internet eingeblendet werden.
Google zeichnet Informationen über Ihre +1-Aktivitäten auf, um die Google-Dienste für Sie und andere zu verbessern. Um die Google +1-Schaltfläche verwenden zu können, benötigen Sie ein weltweit sichtbares, öffentliches Google-Profil, das zumindest den für das Profil gewählten Namen enthalten muss. Dieser Name wird in allen Google-Diensten verwendet. In manchen Fällen kann dieser Name auch einen anderen Namen ersetzen, den Sie beim Teilen von Inhalten über Ihr Google-Konto verwendet haben. Die Identität Ihres Google-Profils kann Nutzern angezeigt werden, die Ihre E-Mail-Adresse kennen oder über andere identifizierende Informationen von Ihnen verfügen.

Verwendung der erfassten Informationen:
Neben den oben erläuterten Verwendungszwecken werden die von Ihnen bereitgestellten Informationen gemäß den geltenden Google-Datenschutzbestimmungen genutzt. Google veröffentlicht möglicherweise zusammengefasste Statistiken über die +1-Aktivitäten der Nutzer bzw. gibt diese an Nutzer und Partner weiter, wie etwa Publisher, Inserenten oder verbundene Websites.

Für die Nutzung von Twitter
Auf unseren Seiten sind Funktionen des Dienstes Twitter eingebunden. Diese Funktionen werden angeboten durch die Twitter Inc., Twitter, Inc. 1355 Market St, Suite 900, San Francisco, CA 94103, USA. Durch das Benutzen von Twitter und der Funktion “Re-Tweet” werden die von Ihnen besuchten Webseiten mit Ihrem Twitter-Account verknüpft und anderen Nutzern bekannt gegeben. Dabei werden auch Daten an Twitter übertragen.

Wir weisen darauf hin, dass wir als Anbieter der Seiten keine Kenntnis vom Inhalt der übermittelten Daten sowie deren Nutzung durch Twitter erhalten. Weitere Informationen hierzu finden Sie in der Datenschutzerklärung von Twitter unter http://twitter.com/privacy.

Ihre Datenschutzeinstellungen bei Twitter können Sie in den Konto-Einstellungen unter http://twitter.com/account/settings ändern.